engineering

The Engineering for Human Rights Initiative Provided Written Comments on Governor’s Council on Climate Change (GC3)’s Draft Reports

The Connecticut Governor’s Council for Climate Change (GC3)  invited the  Engineering for Human Rights Initiative to provide public comments on a set of draft reports that make recommendations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt to climate change impacts in Connecticut. The reports cover seven key areas:

  • Equity and Environmental Justice,
  • Public Health and Safety,
  • Science and Technology,
  • Infrastructure and Land Use Adaptation,
  • Progress on Mitigation Strategies,
  • Financing Adaptation and Resilience, and
  • Working and Natural Lands.

The GC3 was established in 2015, and it was expanded by Governor Ned Lamont in 2019 (see Executive Order No. 3) with the goals of implementing greenhouse gas emissions reductions strategies, preparing and adapting our state for the impacts of climate change, and ensuring strategies are equitable and protect the most vulnerable communities. The comments can be seen below.

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Research on COVID-19: Collaboration at the Nexus of Engineering, Human Rights, and Interdisciplinary Scholarship

The ENG-HR initiative organized the event: “Research on COVID-19: Collaboration at the Nexus of Engineering, Human Rights, and Interdisciplinary Scholarship” on Thursday, September 24.

During this event, researchers and affiliates had the opportunity to meet faculty involved in innovative research and initiatives to understand and tackle the effects of the COVID -19 outbreak in our society. The list of the presentations is below. For additional information on the event or recorded presentations, please contact Davis Chacon-Hurtado at davis.chacon-hurtado@uconn.edu.

  • ‘Applying Chemical Engineering to Address Critical Shortages in the COVID-19 Pandemic’ by Jeffrey McCutcheon
  • ‘Pandemic Journaling Project’ by Sarah Willen
  • ‘Mathematically Modeling COVID-19 Replication’ by Ranjan Srivastava
  • ‘The Ethical and Human Rights Implications of Using Digital Contact Tracing Tools to Respond to the Covid-19 Pandemic’ by Audrey Chapman
  • ‘COVID-19 pandemic in the flood season’ by Xinyi Shen and Manos Anagnostou
  • ‘Vulnerability and the Limits of Choice – Homecare Workers’ Views on Risk and COVID-19′ by Kathy Libal
  • ‘Safety Assessment of New England Roadways during the Covid-19 Pandemic’ by John Ivan
  • ‘Community Planning and Resilience for a Climate-Changed World: Insights  from Urban India’ by Prakash Kashwan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Social Impact of Engineering

By William Weir, School of Engineering

Engineers play a major role in developing cell phones, but what responsibility do they have to consider the origin of the materials the phone is made of? Conversely, can they take credit for how the cell phone can protect African farmers from being swindled?

To address issues such as these, the School of Engineering and the Human Rights Institute have created a track of courses within UConn’s human rights minor that explores the social aspects of engineering, including energy, infrastructure, and water resources management.

“We looked to develop courses that contextualize human rights concepts and theories in an engineering practice,” says Shareen Hertel, associate professor of political science and human rights. “We on the human rights side found it really advantageous to reach out to the students who were going to do work with serious human rights implications but hadn’t thought about it that way before.”

Read More @ UConn TodayOriginal Article

 

Class: Human Rights and the Supply Chain

When a white paper was issued earlier this year from a recent UConn conference addressing how to protect human rights and promote social and environmental sustainability in the light manufacturing sector, the document became the most recent addition to resources that help the 200 students pursuing either major or minor studies in human rights.

One of the classes these students can take is an interdisciplinary class, Assessment for Human Rights & Sustainability. Over the past four years, students in the class have examined how companies assess their global supply chains to ensure designs and business practices that promote positive social and economic development, while minimizing the environmental impact on the communities where they make products…

Read More @ UConn Today